Current Publications

Current Publications. I think that may be one of the most insanely dull titles for a post I’ve ever come up with, if not the dullest. That’s a shame, because I’m quite excited about the work and exhibits  documented.

Once or twice a year, I sit down to make sure the information on this site is current. While I have a goal of documenting works as I create them, that often doesn’t happen. Some projects have fairly stiff limitations on when work can be made public and, well, by the time that date rolls around, I’m on to the next thing.

Thus, it’s nice to see a cross-section of the work I’ve been doing over the past couple of years committed to print. It’s also nice to be reminded that I’m a part of a global team effort with other artists, creating work that celebrates, cautions, and entertains.

 

Machine Quilting Unlimited

The September/October edition of Machine Quilting Unlimited has a nice six-page spread on the development of my artwork, Do Dragons Like Cookies?

I created the quilt’s surface design using 3D/CGI, a technique that lets one create and move digital objects to create a scene. It’s been one of my loves for about 25 years, and makes a nice change of pace from painting or other digital techniques. It isn’t at all common in the quilting world, so I hope readers will enjoy the article.

The article came about in a very serendipitous fashion. Publishing a piece on my 3D work had been on my to-do list for the year, and I was delighted when the opportunity to work with MQU appeared. They were lovely people to work with, and I’m very excited to see the article in print.

MQU can be found at bookstores, fabric stores, and online at  https://machinequilting.mqumag.com.

The quilt itself will be at IQF Houston this fall, for those who are in the area and wish to see it in person.

 

Fly Me to the Moon

This book documents a traveling exhibit of quilts commemorating humans’ voyage to the moon. It’s one of Susanne Miller Jones’ efforts; during the past few years, she’s spearheaded several exhibits covering nice, meaty topics.

I have one piece in this exhibit, celebrating the moment when Apollo 8 broke free of the Earth and took three men, Frank Borman, James Lovell, and William Anders, into orbit around the moon. This marked the first time humans had made that voyage; it also demonstrated the viability of traveling to the moon.

The book is due to be released September 28. It can be purchased from Amazon and various other book retailers.

A current exhibition schedule and photos of the exhibit quilts can be seen at https://www.flymetothemoon.gallery.

One recent display venue was Webster Presbyterian in Houston, which some informally refer to as the “NASA Church”. Various members of the congregation were and are involved with the space program, and shared memories sparked by the artwork: http://www.websterpresby.org/VisualArts

I was touched to see my piece augmented by remembrances by Jerry Carr who, among many other things, was Commander of Skylab 4.

 

Quilting Arts Magazine

The October/November edition of Quilting Arts Magazine contains a selection of quilts from the HerStory exhibit, another of Susanne Miller Jones’ efforts. One of mine, celebrating the life and work of physicist and laureate Maria Goeppert-Mayer, is in the magazine.

Quilting Arts can be purchased at bookstores, fabric stores, or online: https://www.interweave.com/store/quilting-arts-october-november-2017-print-edition

The HerStory exhibit is just beginning its travels. A portion of it will be debuting at IQF Houston this fall. That will have another of my quilts, an homage to the artist Mary Blair. Susanne keeps an updated tour schedule on her website: http://www.susannemjones.com/herstory-exhibit-schedule/

 

Threads of Resistance

It’s funny how one’s attitudes can change over time. I grew up in a household in which the only news consumed was that broadcast in the evening on the television, lines read by a serious-faced white male broadcaster. Beyond mocking the county commissioner for re-graveling the roads only during election years, politics weren’t discussed much at home. My father sometimes declared that he was politically independent, neither a Democrat nor a Republican, yet if pressed, I doubt he could list many instances when he voted as a Democrat, if there were any at all.

I was unclear on what any of it meant, other than picking up on an “us versus them” mentality more suitable for sports teams. The first time I went to vote as an adult, it was a horrible shock. I was ill-prepared and I didn’t recognize most of the names or issues on the sample ballot. That spurred an endless cycle of having to research every blasted issue every blasted election year.

One thing I learned along the way is that politics matters. It can be annoying, confusing, tedious, and inspire one to new heights of cynicism, but it really matters. Politics affects issues both minor and major.

Among other things, it affects whether citizens have clean air to breathe and clean water to drink, and whether people of different colors are allowed to drink that water from the same fountain. It affects how well the firefighters and police are paid in one’s town and whether they have adequate equipment. It determines how we treat people who don’t look like us or speak our language, but have resources we want. When there’s a tragedy or a disaster, such as a hurricane hitting a city, it affects whether there’s a government-based aid organization ready to help.

Politics is a reflection of a society’s values and priorities. It isn’t, or shouldn’t be, a matter of people dividing themselves up into different groups so they can hoot and jeer with a sports team mentality.

As we grow older and have kids and grandkids, our thoughts may turn to the situation we’re leaving behind for them. That, too, is impacted by politics. Will there be unspoiled national parks? Will issues such as global climate change be faced and addressed in a responsible manner, or will elected officials continue to avoid the issue or outright deny that it exists? Will citizens continue to have some degree of free speech? Will journalists be harassed or tossed in jail when they attempt to report truths to the populace? Will we treat refugees from other countries with compassion or with contempt?

After witnessing the behavior of the Trump administration for seven months, I have very grave concerns. So do many other artists. That is, in a nutshell, is the drive behind the Threads of Resistance exhibit.

More than 550 pieces were submitted to this exhibit, expressing concerns about the actions and policies of the Trump administration. Sixty-three were accepted into the traveling exhibit; I’m proud to have two of mine included.

The catalog shows the works which were accepted into the traveling exhibit. It can be purchased at Amazon and various other book retailers.

All of the submitted pieces, plus an exhibit schedule, can be seen here: http://threadsofresistance.org/schedule.html

I encourage people to go have a look at the exhibit and consider the issues. They have broad, long-lasting, very serious consequences that transcend political affiliation.

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